About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
ranked among the worst in the nation, even though the district was spending more per pupil than large u.s. cities, almost $13,000 per student. but in 2009, washington, d.c. became first in the nation to tie teacher salaries to student test scores under a program called "impact." teachers rated highly effective can get annual bonuses up to $25,000 if they stay at that achievement level for two straight years, they can also get a base salary increase of $20,000. a highly effective teacher can earn $76,000, the first year, and reach $131,000 in just nine years. less effective teachers earn 51,000 to start and are fired if they get poor involveses for two straight years. this year, 98 teachers were fired for poor performance. but nathan saunders, president of the washington teachers union, says the system is unfair to teachers when many of their student have barriers to learning, such as poverty. >> the penalties are so immediate and so painful, not just immediate in terms of their paycheck, but also immediate in terms of their careers. >> reporter: in washington, test scores are still amon
you, judge. >> new studies shows stall construction projects are on the rise in america's large of the city. according to a new report from builders there are hundreds of vacant lots and half finished projects around new york city despite all of them having the necessary permits for construction. now the news from brooklyn. that is this about? >>guest: well, there are e monuments in a bad economy. a finish which is one of several hundrednd at the city like that where the construction just stops. the workers are one day and suddenly they never show up again and they are e and quiet for years. this is a legacy of the 2008 financial crisis having to do with long-term institutional borrowing and lending and that is a problem. look at the numbers: 691 inactive sites up 17 percent in new york city since february. 45 percent dormant since 1999. it is run out of money or a combination of running out or fought having enough sales or the market for rentals does not appear to be strong enough to justify completion. >>guest: the american institute of architects are putting together develope
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4